«C-TRAN: OUR COMMUNITY, OUR PROMISE»

«C-TRAN: OUR COMMUNITY,
OUR PROMISE»

C-TRAN Through The Years...

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Voters approve a 0.3 percent sales tax for a county-wide bus system, leading to the creation of the Clark County Public Transportation Benefit Area.
1980

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C-TRAN officially begins service; Dave Ashcraft is the new transit agency’s interim director.
1981

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  • Construction begins on C-TRAN’s main administrative, operations and maintenance facility on Northeast 65th Avenue in Vancouver.
  • Les White becomes C-TRAN Executive Director/CEO.
  • Total ridership (C-TRAN's first full year of operation): 1,216,114
1982

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The C-TRAN facilities on Northeast 65th Avenue are completed and dedicated.
1983

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The Seventh Street Transit Center opens in downtown Vancouver.
1984

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  • The Evergreen Transit Center opens in east Vancouver.
  • C-TRAN offers Sunday bus service for the first time.
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act becomes federal law.
  • Total rideship: 2,285,944
1990

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C-TRAN celebrates 10 years in operation.
1991

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  • Voters reject a sales tax proposal that would have extended the Portland area’s light rail system to Clark County.
  • Total ridership: 5,285,944
1995

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Les White leaves C-TRAN; Keith Parker is named Executive Director/CEO.
1998

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  • Washington state voters repeal the motor vehicle excise tax, or MVET. The measure, Initiative-695, leads to a $12 million annual cut to C-TRAN, slashing 40 percent of C-TRAN’s yearly operating budget.
  • C-TRAN brings its paratransit service, C-VAN, in-house to be fully operated by C-TRAN staff.
1999

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  • C-TRAN eliminates 80 positions and cuts service levels after losing state funding as a result of I-695.
  • The C-TRAN Board of Directors approves selling advertising on buses for the first time in the agency’s history.
  • Keith Parker leaves C-TRAN; Lynne Griffith is named Executive Director/CEO.
  • Fisher’s Landing Transit Center opens in east Vancouver.
  • Total ridership: 6,793,646
2000

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Voters defeat a proposed sales tax increase of 0.3 percent to fund public transportation.
2004

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  • C-TRAN reduces its boundaries from county-wide to cover only the boundaries of Vancouver, Camas, Washougal, Battle Ground, Ridgefield, La Center and Yacolt, plus the urban growth boundary around Vancouver.
  • Voters approve a sales tax increase of 0.2 percent in a special election, boosting C-TRAN’s funding and preventing major service cuts.
  • Total ridership: 5,812,417
2005

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  • Lynne Griffith leaves C-TRAN; Jeff Hamm is named Executive Director/CEO effective January 1, 2007.
  • C-TRAN celebrates 25 years in operation.
2006

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  • The 99th Street Transit Center opens as part of a larger service adjustment.
  • The Seventh Street Transit Center closes.
2007

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  • C-TRAN implements a new logo and brand.
  • Hybrid diesel-electric buses are added to the C-TRAN fleet for the first time.
2008

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  • The C-TRAN Board of Directors adopts the C-TRAN 2030 plan.
  • Total ridership: 6,552,570
2010

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Voters approve a sales tax increase of 0.2 percent, putting C-TRAN on firm financial footing and preventing service cuts.
2011

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  • Voters reject a proposed sales tax increase to fund C-TRAN’s share of light rail operating costs in Vancouver.
  • Salmon Creek Park & Ride reopens in a new location.
2012

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The C-TRAN Board of Directors approves using existing reserve funds to pay for the local share of its bus rapid transit project; a federal grant pays for the majority of the project cost.
2014

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  • Construction begins on The Vine, a bus rapid transit line serving Vancouver’s Fourth Plain corridor between downtown and the Vancouver Mall.
  • The C-TRAN board adopts a new composition, updating how each jurisdiction in the system is represented on the 10-member body.
  • Total ridership: 6,174,506
2015

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  • The Vine begins service, officially launching the first bus rapid transit system in the Portland-Vancouver region.
  • Jeff Hamm retires; Shawn M. Donaghy is named Chief Executive Officer.
2017

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  • Hop Fastpass, a regional electronic fare system shared by C-TRAN, TriMet and the Portland Streetcar, goes live.
  • C-TRAN discontinues advertising on its buses.
2017

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  • C-TRAN begins planning its second bus rapid transit line, the Mill Plain BRT Project.
  • Hybrid diesel-electric buses now comprise more than half of C-TRAN’s fixed route fleet.
2018